The shed, as viewed from the north.

The shed, as viewed from the north.

My parents are remodeling their kitchen. They have a large McMansion and their kitchen alone is almost half the size of the house we want to build. They contracted with a kitchen remodeler who is very conscious of environmental issues and chemical sensitivities. So the remodeler agreed to remove the cabinets intact, wrap them, and even load them onto my truck so we can recycle them by installing them in our house!

So we needed a place to store a lot of cabinets, we needed it fast, and we needed it cheap. I first thought about a metal shed but even on Craigslist used ones were going for $300 or more, and they were on the small side. I priced the materials for a simple wood-frame shed I could build myself and found, for about the same money, I could put up a more lasting and durable shed with eight-foot ceilings. I thought I could do it in a weekend.

Well I made two mistakes in that calculation. The first was thinking I could do it in a weekend… it took two. The second was thinking I could do it for $300. It cost twice that. Mostly because I decided since we were building a more permanent structure we wanted to last, it should be made of more durable materials. Specifically, a treated wood floor structure and a metal roof.

The shed, as viewed from the south, with the pumphouse in the background.

The shed, as viewed from the south, with the pumphouse in the background.

I forgot the camera until the last day of work, so there are no in-process pictures like there are for the pumphouse. These pictures are of how it is at present, and how it will be for a while yet.

There’s no door (we snagged a wooden entry door out of a dumpster, but it will take the better part of a day to hang it) and the osb sheathing needs to be covered. A coat of deck sealer will have to do until we can come up with something more permanent. I want to use some kind of salvage material for the siding, but I want to use it creatively so it won’t end up looking like a ratty old shack.

Thanks to Wifey’s dad for helping with the walls and roof. Thanks to Wifey for parting with DH for two weekends instead of one. Hugs, dearie!

Shed interior with skylight and polycarbonate window

Shed interior with skylight and polycarbonate window

Update: Since so many people have asked why the roof is the way it is, here’s some explanation:

  1. It seemed easier to drive down the Interstate with 10′ steel panels in the truck bed rather than 12′ panels
  2. A single long slope would have had to deal with more uplift in high winds
  3. A gable roof with the pitch in the middle would have made rainwater harvesting more difficult
  4. The short side is roofed with tinted polycarbonate, making a marvelous skylight under which I intend to place my workbench
  5. It looks cool and makes people scratch their heads
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